Environmentally friendly dye informs County staff

Environmentally friendly dye informs County staff
CALEDONIA—Haldimand County used a safe and environmentally friendly dye to study flows in the Grand River on Thursday, August 26, 2021. The test was part of ongoing monitoring studies related to the County’s wastewater treatment operations, with the dye released via the Caledonia wastewater treatment plant. —Haldimand Press photo by Jillian Zynomirski.

By Haldimand Press Staff

CALEDONIA—Haldimand County used a safe and environmentally friendly dye to study flows in the Grand River on Thursday, August 26, 2021. The test was part of ongoing monitoring studies related to the County’s wastewater treatment operations.

Deborah Sinclair and Clark Heitman of Hutchison Environmental Services attended the Grand River and Caledonia wastewater treatment plant to carry out the work. 

Dye was added to the Grand River via the Caledonia wastewater treatment plant from 7 a.m. to approximately 8 p.m. People may have seen a pink tint in the river for up to 24 hours after the test between the treatment plant, located at the end of Forfar Street East, and the King Street bridge in York. 

“The firm contracted to carry out this work indicated that the dye study confirmed our understanding of the mixing of the Caledonia wastewater treatment plant effluent with the Grand River; it is rapidly diluted and hugs the riverbank,” explained Kyra Hayes, Supervisor of Customer Experience and Communications for Haldimand County. 

CALEDONIA—Deborah Sinclair and Clark Heitman of Hutchison Environmental Services carried out an environmentally friendly dye study in the Grand River on August 26, 2021. Clark is shown using a fluorometer, which measures the amount of dye in the water.

Dye tracers are a common way to see effluent spreads in rivers and other waterways. The dye dilutes quickly as it moves downstream, doesn’t reduce dissolved oxygen levels in the river, and is safe for people, pets, aquatic life, and other wildlife.

The study’s purpose is to further understand the Caledonia wastewater treatment plant’s effluent plume (treated wastewater). 

The major aim of wastewater treatment is to remove as much of the suspended solids and nutrients as possible before the remaining water, called effluent, is discharged back to the environment. 

Haldimand’s wastewater treatment processes operate under strict regulations and meets or exceeds standards set by the provincial and federal government to protect public health and the environment.

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